Tag Archives: Training

Have you heard about MACRA?

MACRA is the law that congress passed regarding Medicare in 2015. I found out about the new legislation a couple weeks ago. And, I have to tell you guys, I am not excited. 

There are going to be a LOT of changes coming for providers once the law goes into effect in 2019 and small practices will be bearing a considerable burden. 

But you all know that I would not be posting scare tactic articles here about something that won’t happen for over two years. So, the statistics that determine whether your providers (or you, if you are a provider) are going to get penalized up to 9% are going to be drawn from self reported data from 2017.

That means that in order not to be penalized in 2019, you and your providers need to make changes as of the 1st of the year. In two months.

New Generation and our sister company, J&J Billing, Inc. are putting on four free one hour trainings. Normally we charge for our webinars, but it is so important that providers know about MACRA and the changes that are coming, that we are waiving the fee. So, fill this form out, and fax it back to me and I will make sure that the online classes we schedule will accommodate everyone .

MACRA Training Availability Form

Fax (909) 367-2922

I will post the final schedule on the blog once we have all the feedback. You will need to email me to sign up for the class. I am working on a fancy-pants sign up sheet for my classes, but it is still quite a work in progress. I am a very good biller and a very bad coder. 

Seriously people, print the form, send it back. This is free. You NEED this information. Tell your friends. 

 

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Filed under CMS, Doctor's Office, MACRA, Medical Billing, Medicare, Online classes

The front lines in the battle for your A/R

Your front desk staff are the marines of your office. The doctor is the general, the office manager and billers are the lieutenant and sergeants, and you can’t run a successful campaign without them. But your front desk staff are the boots on the ground, first in, last out. Their actions represent the first impression patients get of your office, and they have the last interaction with patients before those patients leave. I know that mostly, by the time you come to this blog for help, the patient has already been seen and you need to know how to get the charge paid.

But I get your emails, I know what you really need.

In a perfect world, insurances would just pay what they were supposed to, patients would send in their checks on time, and we could all leave work at 5:00. This post will help you get a little closer to that perfect world, and it all begins with your front desk. Many offices, family practice and specialists alike, end up seeing patients with insurance that is not on file, termed, or non-contracted. This happens for a variety of reasons. New patient’s tell us they have PPOs when they really come in with HMOs. Established patients forget to tell us that they changed insurance 2 months ago. HMO patients forget that if they change their PCP, they can’t come to us anymore. Howeever, with the proper procedures, the number of patients with these issues that actually get in to see the doctor can be virtually eliminated. I recently had someone contact me to train their front desk, and this is the checklist that we put together to ensure that the doctor will be paid for every service he performs.

When a patient calls in to schedule an appointment…

  1. New patients – Many offices send patients to complete their paperwork online. If you do this in your office, you only need to get the name and phone number when the patient is on the phone.
    1. Name and phone number
    2. Insurance name and id#
    3. Date of birth
    4. Verify insurance
    5. Schedule appointment
  1. Established patients
    1. We have your phone number as (909) 555-5555, is that still correct?
    2. And we have you with BlueCross BlueShield, is that correct?
    3. Schedule appointment

The day before the appointment….

  1. New patients
    1. Call to confirm appointment
    2. If your patient filled out their paperwork online, verify eligibility
  2. Established patients
    1. If patient has not been seen within 30 days, verify insurance (eligibility, deductible, copay)
    2. Call to confirm appointment
    3. Also, please be aware you have a balance of $XX.00. See you on Friday!

When the patient checks in…

  1. We still have your address as 1122 N. Del Sol Lane, is that correct?
  2. Collect any copay/deductible. If you are collecting toward a deductible, charge $50 and tell the patients this will be applied toward their deductible. Anything over that the insurance applies will be billed to their account. Unless the patient is in for a post-op, blood draw, or follow up for an established condition. In that case, the service the doctor performs probably won’t end up with an allowed amount of more than $50.00. We want to be very careful that we don’t charge patient’s more than the insurance allowed amount when we collect toward their deductible.
  3. Copy any new insurance cards

When the patient leaves the office…

  1. Schedule any necessary follow up appointment.
  2. Collect for any additional procedures performed (cash patients)
  3. Put in for any referrals

I have included this Front desk checklist on the links and tools page for you to download. These procedures are small changes that can have a transformative effect on your office and allow your billers to concentrate on what you pay them for. Namely, fighting with the insurance companies. When your billers have to run around after the front desk and try to solve these issues after the fact, it’s too late. As always, call or email with any questions. I love hearing from you.

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Filed under Accounts receivable, Administrations, Authorizations, Billing, Denials, Medical Billing, Office policy, Office Visit